Past Motions

Motions that have been voted on by the Board of Directors in the past month will be posted to this page by approximately the last day of each month. Feedback on any motion should be directed to executive.secretary@asca.org for distribution to the Board.
 
As rule changes are approved, the Executive Secretary will make those changes to the rulebooks posted on the website, with the effective date noted, in order for the membership to see what changes will be in effect in the upcoming competitive season.
 
Please refer to past Secretary’s Reports for information on motions older than 30 days.

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

BD.17.16 ASCA Website Photo Policy

Approve: Unanimous

Motion carries.

 

Motion by Gray

Second by Vest

We move to approve the following ASCA Website Photo policy. 

 

A​SCA’s website consists of two sections, the ​Public section which is open to ​the world, and the ​Member’s section​ which is open to members only to post a photo of their dog(s) in the My Dogs section of the website. In order to maintain the highest standard for ASCA’s professional image to the public, the Webmaster will choose photos sent in from the membership ​to post in the Public section ​by employing the following criteria:

 

a. Photos of Australian Shepherds that adhere as closely as possible to the ASCA breed standard.

 

Comment: This policy will portray the Australian Shepherd as per the Breed Standard to the public while providing the membership with an avenue to post a photo of their dog(s) in the Members Only, My Dogs section of the ASCA website.

 

Effective Date: Upon BOD approval.

 

Add to the Policy Book – Section 21 Technical Assistance, 21.1.2

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

BD.17.15 ASCA’s Website Homepage

Approve: Unanimous

Motion carries.

 

Motion by Gray

Second by Vest

We move to approve the following policy for the ASCA Website.

 

Effective Date: Upon BOD approval.

 

In order to present ASCA to the world in a professional, welcoming and informative manner, the ASCA Board will determine website content and topics to be displayed on its homepage.  This information will be provided to the Webmaster via the System Liaison and will include BOD’s updates as they occur.

 

Comments: Maintaining a welcoming and informative website is imperative to ASCA’s future. The goal of the Board is to present the ASCA website homepage in a manner that readily provides information to members as well as provides visitors with a sense of the ASCA community.

 

Add to the Policy Book – Section 21 Technical Assistance, 21.1.3

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

BD.17.14 Volunteer Appreciation

Approve: Unanimous

Motion carries.

 

Motion by Gray

Second by Vest

We move to approve creation of an ASCA Volunteer Appreciation policy.

 

Effective Date: Upon BOD approval.

 

The BOD will place a half page announcement annually in the Aussie Times (Jan/Feb and July/Aug editions), and monthly in the AussENews, requesting the membership submit photos and/or stories about volunteers who have gone above and beyond in their efforts on behalf of ASCA.

a. Submissions will be sent to the Executive Secretary.

b. Two or more volunteer Directors will provide the Liaison to the Webmaster with bi-monthly updates that include pictures and/or stories of ASCA volunteers to be displayed on the homepage and other ASCA media.

c. Selected photos and/or stories will be displayed at Nationals.

 

Comments: Volunteers are an integral part of ASCA. Providing BOD and ASCA wide recognition may inspire more members to volunteer.

 

Add to the Policy Book – Section 7 Awards, 7.7.4

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

BD.17.13 DNA Committee Mission Statement

Approve: Gibson, King, Kissman, Roberts, Silveira, Vest, Wesen

Oppose: Gray

Abstain: None

Non-Voting: DeChant

Motion carries.

 

Motion by Vest

Second by Roberts

We move to approve the DNA Committee mission statement:

 

Mission Statement: The goal of the ASCA DNA Committee is to support, maintain, and advance the ASCA DNA program thereby ensuring the integrity of the ASCA registry.

 

Comment: The DNA Mission Statement will be displayed at the top of the DNA Committee information on the ASCA website.

 

Effective Date: Upon approval of the BOD.

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

BD.17.12 Agility Committee Mission Statement

Approve: Gibson, King, Kissman, Roberts, Vest, Wesen

Oppose: Silveira

Abstain: Gray

Non-Voting: DeChant

Motion carries.

Comment from Silveira: ASCA’s Agility program was designed as a performance event for Australian Shepherds with the intent of preserving their strong work ethic and athleticism. There should be some mention of this in the mission statement. This mission statement sounds to general as if we were merely running an all breed agility program.

 

Motion by Vest

Second by Roberts

We move to approve the ASCA Agility Committee mission statement:

 

Mission Statement: To promote and improve the agility experience for all involved in ASCA agility.

 

Comment: The Mission Statement will be displayed at the top of the Agility Committee information on the ASCA website. The Mission Statement will also be added to the top of page 1 of the Agility Rulebook at the next printing date.

 

Effective Date: Upon BOD approval

 

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

AG.17.03 Contact/Tunnel Discrimination Distance

Approve: DeChant, Gray, King, Kissman, Roberts, Silveira, Vest, Wesen

Oppose: Gibson

Abstain: None

Motion carries.

Comment from Gibson: Why did five out of eleven committee members not vote on this motion? It does not seem to have the support of the committee.

 

Motion by Roberts

I move to approve the below motion from the Agility Committee:

 

Effective Date: June 1, 2017

 

Motion by Chet Katwyk

Second by Sue Graham

I would like to make this a Motion to standardize the distance between the tunnel and contact obstacle for discrimination challenges.

 

Rationale: Currently the distances and the point of measurement are different depending upon the class.  To make it easier to remember we could standardize the distances to: elite 0-1′; open 1′-2′; and novice 1′-3′ and state that the point of measurement is the edge of the contact and the edge of the tunnel closest to the contact.  A statement allowing for judges to waive the distance requirements if the tunnel is used as a link to other sections of the courses is also included. The change in Novice distance from 3′-4′ to 1′-3′ is a reflection that a lot but not all trainers don’t train with the Tunnel at a distance of 3′ from the contacts. That in some courses Novice handlers get caught behind the contact forcing a cross behind after the Tunnel resulting in more young dogs spinning.

 

Results of the committee vote:

Approve: 6

Oppose: 0

Non-voting: 5

 

PROPOSED WORDING

5 Regular Class

5.4 Couse Design

5.4.1 General Guidelines

The Regular courses must follow the following guidelines:

·         The distance between obstacles should be an average of 21 feet (6.4 meters) with the minimum distance between two obstacles being no less than 18 feet (5.5 meters).

·         There should be no 90 degree turns on the course without a minimum distance (shortest path) of 20 feet (6.1 meters) between the obstacles.

·         All double bar jumps shall have top bars at the same height and have as straight on of an approach as possible, however the use of a double bar jump on a gradual arc within the flow of the course is allowed.  A double bar jump shall never follow a closed tunnel. There must be a minimum spacing of 21 feet from the next obstacle on the approach and landing side of the double bar jumps.

·         There shall be no sharp turns out of the closed tunnel and the next obstacle shall not be closer than 20 feet from the exit of the closed tunnel.

·         The tire jump shall have as straight on of an approach as possible, however the use of the tire jump in a gradual arc within the flow of the course is allowed.

·         There shall be a clear handler path available on both sides of each piece of equipment.

·         Considerations for safety shall be assessed for all size dogs.

·         Courses that test obstacle discrimination shall use the guidelines described for each level.  Tunnels used next to contact obstacles as links to other sections of the course (not as discrimination challenges) can be placed farther away than the specified distances.

 

5.4.2 Novice Level Course Design

At the Novice level the goal is to test the dog’s ability to perform the obstacles safely. The dog shall be asked to execute the obstacles at a moderate rate of speed. course for the Novice level should also follow these guidelines:

·         The course shall consist of 14-16 obstacles.

·         The Start and Finish obstacles must be different obstacles with a minimum distance between them on the course of 40’-50’ (12.2 m-15.2 m); preferably 50’ (15.2 m) or more.

·         The line of weave poles used shall consist of 5-6 poles.

·         It is recommended, but not required, that any segments of the course which encourage a change of handling sides shall take place in a tunnel or while executing the A-frame.

·         The course design should encourage a beginning level of obstacle discrimination. If a tunnel is placed next to a contact obstacle for a discrimination challenge, the distance between the tunnel and contact obstacle must be 1 – 3 feet (30.5 cm – .914 meters) as measured from the edge of the contact obstacle closest to the tunnel and the closest edge of the tunnel.

 

5.4.3 Open Level Course Design

At the Open Level, the goal is to test the handler’s and dog’s ability to perform the obstacles at a faster rate of speed, while performing the obstacles with more directional and distance control and exhibit obstacle discrimination.  The course design should encourage handlers to work the dog from both sides comfortably.  The course for the Open Level shall also follow these guidelines:

·         The course shall consist of 16-18 obstacles.

·         The Start and Finish obstacles must be different obstacles with a minimum distance between them on the course of 30-40’ (9.1 m-12.2 m); preferably 50’ (15.2 m) or more.

·         There shall be 10-12 weave poles on the course, which could be comprised of one long set of 10-12 poles or two short sets of 5-6 poles.

·         The course shall encourage at least two changes of handling sides that are visible to the dog (such as while the dog is performing a jumping sequence.) The course shall encourage at least three total changes of handling sides.

·         The course design should encourage an Open level of obstacle discrimination. If a tunnel is placed next to a contact obstacle for a discrimination challenge, the distance between the tunnel and contact obstacle must be 1-2 feet (30.5 cm – 61 cm) as measured from the edge of the contact obstacle closest to the tunnel and the closest edge of the tunnel.

·         The course design should have smooth flow while encouraging the handler to send the dog farther out for more distance handling.

·         The course could consist of sequences in which the course flow repeats itself for several obstacles before changing direction from the previous sequence to the new course sequence.

·         The closing sequence should encourage a brisk exit while still demonstrating good handling control.

 

5.4.4 Elite Level Course Design

At the Elite Level, more complex handler strategies are tested, with the dog moving at a brisk pace.  The dog should work on both sides of the handler, be able to discriminate between obstacles and freely move away from the handler while performing the obstacles with greater distance and directional control. The course for the Elite level shall also follow these guidelines:

·         The course shall consist of 18-20 obstacles.

·         The Start and Finish obstacles must be different obstacles with a minimum distance between them on the course of 30-40’ (9.1 m-12.2 m); preferably 50’ (15.2 m) or more.

·         There shall be a line of weave poles consisting of 10-12 poles.  An additional set of 5-6 poles is optional.

·         The course shall encourage at least three changes of handling sides which is visible to the dog (such as while the dog is performing a jumping sequence).

·         The course design should encourage a more advanced level of obstacle discrimination. If a tunnel is placed next to a contact obstacle for a discrimination challenge, the distance between the tunnel and contact obstacle must be 0-1 feet (0-30.5 cm) as measured from the edge of the contact obstacle closest to the tunnel and the closest edge of the tunnel.

 

7 Gamblers Class

7.4 Course Design Requirements

Novice:

*Discrimination Test: At the Novice level, a discrimination test is a choice between two or more obstacles set no closer than 10 feet apart. If a tunnel is placed next to a contact obstacle for a discrimination challenge, the distance between the tunnel and contact obstacle must be a minimum of 1 – 3 feet (30.5 cm – .914 meters) as measured from the edge of the contact obstacle closest to the tunnel and the closest edge of the tunnel. The teeter will not be used as a discrimination obstacle.

 

Open:

*Discrimination Test: At the Open level, a discrimination test will be a choice between two obstacles no closer than 10 feet from each other. These obstacles may be side by side or as an off-course option. If a tunnel is placed next to a contact obstacle for a discrimination challenge, the distance between the tunnel and contact obstacle must be 1-2 feet (30.5 cm – 61 cm) as measured from the edge of the contact obstacle closest to the tunnel and the closest edge of the tunnel.

 

Elite:

*Discrimination Test: At the Elite level, a discrimination test will be a choice between two obstacles. These obstacles may be side by side, or as an off-course option. If side by side, the two obstacles will be a minimum of 10 feet from each other. If a tunnel is placed next to a contact obstacle for a discrimination challenge, the distance between the tunnel and contact obstacle must be 0-1 (0-30.5 cm) as measured from the edge of the contact obstacle closest to the tunnel and the closest edge of the tunnel.

 

CURRENT WORDING

5 Regular Class

5.4 Couse Design

5.4.1 General Guidelines

The Regular courses must follow the following guidelines:

·         The distance between obstacles should be an average of 21 feet (6.4 meters) with the minimum distance between two obstacles being no less than 18 feet (5.5 meters).

·         There should be no 90 degree turns on the course without a minimum distance (shortest path) of 20 feet (6.1 meters) between the obstacles.

·         All double bar jumps shall have top bars at the same height and have as straight on of an approach as possible, however the use of a double bar jump on a gradual arc within the flow of the course is allowed.  A double bar jump shall never follow a closed tunnel. There must be a minimum spacing of 21 feet from the next obstacle on the approach and landing side of the double bar jumps.

·         There shall be no sharp turns out of the closed tunnel and the next obstacle shall not be closer than 20 feet from the exit of the closed tunnel.

·         The tire jump shall have as straight on of an approach as possible, however the use of the tire jump in a gradual arc within the flow of the course is allowed.

·         There shall be a clear handler path available on both sides of each piece of equipment.

·         Considerations for safety shall be assessed for all size dogs.

 

5.4.2 Novice Level Course Design

At the Novice level the goal is to test the dog’s ability to perform the obstacles safely.  The dog shall be asked to execute the obstacles at a moderate rate of speed. The course for the Novice level should also follow these guidelines:

·         The course shall consist of 14-16 obstacles.

·         The Start and Finish obstacles must be different obstacles with a minimum distance between them on the course of 40’-50’ (12.2 m-15.2 m); preferably 50’ (15.2 m) or more.

·         The line of weave poles used shall consist of 5-6 poles.

·         It is recommended, but not required, that any segments of the course which encourage a change of handling sides shall take place in a tunnel or while executing the A-frame.

·         The course design should encourage a beginning level of obstacle discrimination.  The obstacles used for obstacle discrimination shall not be closer than 4 feet (1.2 meters) to each other if a tunnel is used under a contact obstacle.

 

5.4.3 Open Level Course Design

At the Open Level, the goal is to test the handler’s and dog’s ability to perform the obstacles at a faster rate of speed, while performing the obstacles with more directional and distance control and exhibit obstacle discrimination.  The course design should encourage handlers to work the dog from both sides comfortably.  The course for the Open Level shall also follow these guidelines:

·         The course shall consist of 16-18 obstacles.

·         The Start and Finish obstacles must be different obstacles with a minimum distance between them on the course of 30-40’ (9.1 m-12.2 m); preferably 50’ (15.2 m) or more.

·         There shall be 10-12 weave poles on the course, which could be comprised of one long set of 10-12 poles or two short sets of 5-6 poles.

·         The course shall encourage at least two changes of handling sides that are visible to the dog (such as while the dog is performing a jumping sequence.) The course shall encourage at least three total changes of handling sides.

·         The course design should encourage an Open level of obstacle discrimination.  If a tunnel is used under a contact obstacle for obstacle discrimination, then the edge of the tunnel shall be set 1-2 feet (30.5 cm – 61 cm) away from the contact obstacle.

·         The course design should have smooth flow while encouraging the handler to send the dog farther out for more distance handling.

·         The course could consist of sequences in which the course flow repeats itself for several obstacles before changing direction from the previous sequence to the new course sequence.

·         The closing sequence should encourage a brisk exit while still demonstrating good handling control.

 

5.4.4 Elite Level Course Design

At the Elite Level more complex handler strategies are tested, with the dog moving at a brisk pace.  The dog should work on both sides of the handler, be able to discriminate between obstacles and freely move away from the handler while performing the obstacles with greater distance and directional control.  The course for the Elite level shall also follow these guidelines:

·         The course shall consist of 18-20 obstacles.

·         The Start and Finish obstacles must be different obstacles with a minimum distance between them on the course of 30-40’ (9.1 m-12.2 m); preferably 50’ (15.2 m) or more.

·         There shall be a line of weave poles consisting of 10-12 poles.  An additional set of 5-6 poles is optional.

·         The course shall encourage at least three changes of handling sides which is visible to the dog (such as while the dog is performing a jumping sequence).

·         The course design should encourage a more advanced level of obstacle discrimination.  The obstacles used for obstacle discrimination may be side by side if a tunnel is used under a contact obstacle.

·         The course design should have smooth flow while encouraging the handler to send the dog farther out for more distance handling.

·         The course could consist of sequences in which the course flow repeats itself for several obstacles before changing direction from the previous sequence to the new course sequence.

·         The closing sequence should encourage a brisk exit while still demonstrating good handling control.

 

7 Gamblers Class

7.4 Course Design Requirements

Novice:

*Discrimination Test: At the Novice level, a discrimination test is a choice between two or more obstacles set no closer than 10 feet apart.  If the discrimination is a tunnel beside an A-Frame or Dog Walk, the center of the tunnel may not be closer than 4 feet from the center of the contact obstacle. The teeter will not be used as a discrimination obstacle.

 

Open:

*Discrimination Test: At the Open level, a discrimination test will be a choice between two obstacles no closer than 10 feet from each other. These obstacles may be side by side or as an off course option. If the discrimination is a tunnel next to an A-Frame or Dog Walk, the center of the tunnel may not be more than 3 feet from the center of the contact obstacle.

 

Elite:

*Discrimination Test: At the Elite level, a discrimination test will be a choice between two obstacles. These obstacles may be side by side, or as an off course option. If side by side, the two obstacles will be a minimum of 10 feet from each other. If the discrimination is a tunnel next to a Dog Walk or A-Frame, the tunnel may touch the contact obstacle.

 

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

AG.17.02 Chapter 7 Gamblers Class, Section 2.2 Scoring

Approve: DeChant, Gibson, King, Kissman, Roberts, Silveira, Vest, Wesen

Oppose: Gray

Motion carries.

 

Motion by Roberts

I move to approve the below motion from the Agility Committee:

 

Effective Date: June 1, 2017

 

Motion by Jan Niblock

Second by Sherry Butler

 

Rationale: There has been some concern over the way the wording for the first obstacle of the gamble which has resulted in judges not calling it in the same manner. After a poll on the judge’s list, the majority of the judges said that the first obstacle cannot be repeated and feel that the wording needs to be clarified. Some judges are interpreting the wording “the gamble begins when the dog correctly performs the first gamble obstacle…” as meaning that they can repeat it.  Since the wording could be interpreted in that manner, it needs to clarified so that there is no confusion over how to judge the first obstacle.

 

Results of the committee vote:

Approve: 7

Oppose: 3

Non-Voting: 1

Letter of Dissent from Sue Graham: The intent of this motion was to clarify that if a contact obstacle is the first obstacle in the gamble closing sequence (and the performance of the closing sequence has started) that if a dog gets on the obstacle with all four feet and comes off (without successfully/correctly performing the obstacle) then the dog may NOT re-attempt the obstacle and thus the gamble will end.
The sentence in the existing verbiage [The gamble begins when the dog CORRECTLY performs the first GAMBLE obstacle] is supposed to mean that the gamble closing sequence doesn’t start until the dog performs the first gamble obstacle ‘correctly’ i.e. in the correct direction.  For example, if a dog jumps the first jump (gamble obstacle #1) in the wrong direction, since the dog hasn’t performed the obstacle in the correct direction then the judging of the gamble closing sequence hasn’t started.  The problem with the existing verbiage is that some judges were taking the wording literally and allowing dogs to repeat a contact obstacle if the dog got on it and didn’t perform it correctly, at some trials if the dog missed the contact then a handler could ask the dog to repeat the performance and time would be the ‘enemy’ as the dog would probably run out of time to complete the gamble.   There was an inconsistency in what was being allowed by some judges.
By including the reference and requirements of Section 9.2.1 for the performance of all gamble obstacles, this means that the following verbiage is to be applied to the first gamble obstacle.
Section 9.2.1 for tunnel performances states: “Open Tunnel:  The dog must enter the correct end of the tunnel designated by the course and exit the other end of the tunnel.”  (underlined emphasis mine)
For Jumps Section 9.2.1 mandates the following requirements: “Winged and Non-Winged Jumps:  The dog must jump over the bar without displacing it, in the direction designed by the course.  If the dog displaces the bottom bar without displacing the top bar they shall not be faulted.” (underlined emphasis mine)
Similar stipulations apply for the Tire Jump.
My issue is that if we are to apply Section 9.2.1 to all first (#1) obstacles in the gamble closing sequence, then after the first horn sounds, the dog can only perform the first obstacle in the correct direction because of the application of Section 9.2.1.
Comments from other committee members were that a judge should know that a dog can perform the first gamble obstacle backwards and be brought back to perform the obstacle in the correct direction, but I disagree when this motions specifically includes specs from a section that states that the dog MUST perform the obstacle in the correct direction.
In my opinion, if the committee feels that if the first gamble obstacle is a contact obstacle and only one attempt at its performance (once all four paws have touched obstacle) then this is the verbiage that should be included and added to this section.  A simple sentence such as “if the teeter or Aframe is the first obstacle in the gamble, if a dog has touched the obstacle (in the correct direction) with all four paws and leaves the obstacle, another attempt at the performance will not be allowed and the gamble has ended”.
In essence, I feel that instead of clarifying a situation, we are now including additional requirements that make the situation more complicated but we are supposed to rely on a certain amount of knowledge that judges should have but goes against the proposed verbiage that is included.
Thank you for your consideration.

 

PROPOSED WORDING

7.2.2 Scoring

At the end of the point accumulation period, a whistle or horn will sound, indicating that the gamble time has begun. The handler must maneuver their dog into the gamble area to perform the gamble. The gamble begins when the dog performs the first gamble obstacle in the correct direction as defined by Section 9.2.1 Obstacle Performance. For example, if the first obstacle is the A-frame or teeter and the dog gets on the obstacle with all four paws on the ascent side and then comes off without touching the contact zone on the descent side with at least one paw, zero points will be awarded and the gamble is over. The dog must perform the gamble obstacles in the exact order described in the judge’s course design. If the signal (horn, buzzer, or whistle) indicating the gamble time has ended SOUNDS before the dog completes the last gamble obstacle, the gamble is not completed. The Judge shall award points to the last COMPLETED obstacle. For example, if a horn sounds as dog is over the #8 jump, the Judge shall award 2-4-6. Signal must not SOUND for dog to be awarded the obstacle.

 

CURRENT WORDING

7.2.2 Scoring

At the end of the point accumulation period, a whistle or horn will sound, indicating that the gamble time has begun. The handler must maneuver their dog into the gamble area to perform the gamble. The gamble begins when the dog CORRECTLY performs the first GAMBLE obstacle. The dog must perform the gamble obstacles in the exact order described in the judge’s course design. If the signal (horn, buzzer, or whistle) indicating the gamble time has ended SOUNDS before the dog completes the last gamble obstacle, the gamble is not completed. The Judge shall award points to the last COMPLETED obstacle. For example, if a horn sounds as dog is over the #8 jump, the Judge shall award 2-4-6. Signal must not SOUND for dog to be awarded the obstacle.

 

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

AG.17.01 Chapter 12 Finals, Section 2.7 Invitations

Approve: Unanimous

Motion carries.

 

Motion by Roberts

I move to approve the below motion from the Agility Committee:

 

Effective Date: June 1, 2017 (for the 2018 Finals), unless it could be retroactive for the 2017 Finals by allowing the additional dogs in the 2017 Finals. There is currently only one dogs on the Junior Handler Agility Finals list.

 

Motion by Sherry Butler

Second by Chet Katwyk

 

Rationale: This motion is to increase the number of dogs in the Veteran Dog Division Agility Finals from 35 to 45 and decrease the number of dogs in the Junior Handler Agility Finals from 10 to 7. This is to reward the Veteran dogs as they have shown increased support by earning more points than the Standard division dogs.

This will potentially add 7 dogs to the Agility Finals. The 2016 entry fee was $60. This will bring in an additional $420. The additional expense will be $28 in judging fees (28 additional runs) and the cost of 7 Participant ribbons.

On two of the last three Finals Lists (and currently on the 2017 Finals List), the 45th Veteran Division dog has more points than the 60th Standard Division dog. The maximum number of Junior Handlers entered in the Agility Finals in the last 6 years was 6. There were 2016 (OR) 1, 2015 (TN) 5, 2014 (TX) 3, 2013 (CO) 3, 2012 (CA) 6, 2011 (WI) 1. The total number of dogs in the Agility Finals will be no more than 112 (60 Standard Division, 45 Veteran Dog Division, 7 Junior Handler Division) with 448 runs, which is less than the 450 run limit.

Initially, the number of spots for Veteran dogs was half the number of spots for Standard dogs. There weren’t as many Veteran dogs around when the Agility Finals started. Dogs are competing longer now and there are more Veteran dogs competing. The number of points the 45th Veteran dog on the Finals list earned is up 57% from 2014 to the estimate for 2017.  The number of points the 60th Standard dog on the Finals list earned is only up 41%.

 

Results of the committee vote:

Approve: Unanimous

 

PROPOSED WORDING

12.2.7 Invitations

The top 60 qualifiers from the Standard division will be invited to attend the Standard Finals, the top 45 qualifiers from the Veteran Dog division will be invited to attend the Veteran Dog Finals and the top 7 qualifiers from the Junior Handler division will be invited to attend the Juniors Finals. The qualifiers will be ranked based on points accumulated, with the dog accumulating the most points being ranked as #1, the dog with the second most points being ranked as #2, etc. Dogs will be ranked on the list for each division and will be counted towards the total number of invitees (for each division). Current rankings will appear in the Agility Finals List posted on the ASCA website. If there is more than one dog with the same number of points as the 60th qualifier in the Standard division, more than one dog with the same number of points as the 45th qualifier in the Veteran Dog division or more than one dog with the same number of points as the 7th qualifier in the Junior Handler division, then all the dogs with that number of points in the respective divisions will be invited. Alternates will be accepted in list order until all slots are filled.

 

CURRENT WORDING

12.2.7 Invitations

The top 60 qualifiers from the Standard division will be invited to attend the Standard Finals, the top 35 qualifiers from the Veteran Dog division will be invited to attend the Veteran Dog Finals and the top 10 qualifiers from the Junior Handler division will be invited to attend the Juniors Finals. The qualifiers will be ranked based on points accumulated, with the dog accumulating the most points being ranked as #1, the dog with the second most points being ranked as #2, etc. Dogs will be ranked on the list for each division and will be counted towards the total number of invitees (for each division). Current rankings will appear in the Agility Finals List posted on the ASCA website. If there is more than one dog with the same number of points as the 60th qualifier in the Standard division, more than one dog with the same number of points as the 35th qualifier in the Veteran Dog division or more than one dog with the same number of points as the 10th qualifier in the Junior Handler division, then all the dogs with that number of points in the respective divisions will be invited. Alternates will be accepted in list order until all slots are filled.

 

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

OB.17.02 Chapter 4, Sections 8.8 & 8.8 DOE 2 Part A & B, Scoring

Approve: Unanimous

Motion carries.

 

Motion by Wesen

I move to accept this motion from the Obedience Committee.

 

Effective Date: The Effective Date of the motion will be the date that the next Rule Book is printed following approval by the Board of Directors and subsequent publication in the Aussie Times.

 

Motion by Laurie Rubin

Second by Penny Jameson

I move to make the deductions for touching the cone in DOE 2 Parts A and B the same as currently stated in DOE 1 Part B.

 

Rationale: To standardize scoring throughout the Directed Open Exercises and to provide judges information on how to score cone touching in the second half of the DOE’s.  Current rules only mention cone touching in DOE 1 Part B, where the rules say “Minor to substantial deductions depending upon the extent shall be made.”

 

Results of the committee vote:

Approve: 8

Disapprove: 0

Abstain: 0

Non-voting: 2

 

PROPOSED WORDING

4.8.6   DOE 2 – Part A, Scoring

A dog that is non-qualifying on either Part A or Part B shall be scored non-qualifying for DOE 2. (Effective June 2016) A non-qualifying (NQ) score is required for the dog’s failure to stand, for the dog standing outside a four-foot radius of the cone, or for a dog moving major distance from the place where it stood at any time during the stand.

Minor to substantial deductions depending upon the extent shall be made for sniffing, barking, whining, touching the cone with any part of the body except the tail or coat and/or moving a minor distance away from the place where it first stood.

 

4.8.8   DOE 2 – Part B, Scoring:

A non-qualifying (NQ) score is required if the dog fails to remain in the stand within the four-foot radius of the cone until it is directed by the handler to heel, if the dog never makes an attempt to go to heel position, or if the dog is unmanageable.

Substantial deductions, depending on the extent, shall be made for additional commands or signals to heel and failure of the handler to maintain a normal pace while walking behind, approaching, passing the dog or when the dog is falling into heel position and before the judge says “Exercise finished.”

Substantial or minor deductions depending upon the extent shall be made if the dog touches the cone with any part of the body except the tail or coat or if the dog has attempted but not assumed heel position by the time the handler reaches the ring barrier.

 

CURRENT WORDING

4.8.6   DOE 2 – Part A, Scoring

A dog that is non-qualifying on either Part A or Part B shall be scored non-qualifying for DOE 2. (Effective June 2016) A non-qualifying (NQ) score is required for the dog’s failure to stand, for the dog standing outside a four-foot radius of the cone, or for a dog moving major distance from the place where it stood at any time during the stand.

Minor to substantial deductions shall be made for sniffing, barking, whining and/or moving a minor distance away from the place where it first stood.

 

4.8.8   DOE 2 – Part B, Scoring:

A non-qualifying (NQ) score is required if the dog fails to remain in the stand within the four-foot radius of the cone until it is directed by the handler to heel, if the dog never makes an attempt to go to heel position, or if the dog is unmanageable.

Substantial deductions, depending on the extent, shall be made for additional commands or signals to heel and failure of the handler to maintain a normal pace while walking behind, approaching, passing the dog or when the dog is falling into heel position and before the judge says “Exercise finished.”

Substantial or minor deductions shall be made if the dog if the dog has attempted but not assumed heel position by the time the handler reaches the ring barrier. (Effective June 2016)

 

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

OB.17.01 Chapter 4, Section 8.4 DOE 1 Part B, Scoring

Approve: Unanimous

Motion carries.

 

Motion by Wesen

I move to accept this motion from the Obedience Committee.

 

Effective Date: The Effective Date of the motion will be the date that the next Rule Book is printed following approval by the Board of Directors and subsequent publication in the Aussie Times.

 

Motion by Laurie Rubin

Second by Beth MacLehose

I move to make it an NQ to not clearly move towards the cone or not sit within approximately 3′ of the cone.

 

Rationale: The principle part of the Directed Open Exercise 1 is for the dog to be directed to go to a cone. This motion clarifies that a dog must move toward the cone and must sit within approximately 3′ of the cone to qualify. It makes scoring for the sit in DOE 1 more consistent with scoring the stand in the DOE 2.

 

Results of the committee vote:

Approve: 8

Disapprove:  0

Abstain:  0

Non-voting: 2

 

PROPOSED WORDING

4.8.4 DOE 1 – Part B, Scoring

A non-qualifying (NQ) score is required for the dog’s failure to respond to the first command and/or signal to go to the cone, failure to clearly move towards the cone, failure to respond to the first command and/or signal to sit at the cone or to sit automatically at the cone, failure to sit within approximately 3 feet of the cone, or failure to remain stationary in a sit until directed to move by the handler.

Minor to substantial deductions depending upon the extent shall be made for whining, sniffing, barking, touching the cone with any part of the body except the tail or coat, or for sitting partially outside the three (3) foot radius of the cone.

 

CURRENT WORDING

4.8.4 DOE 1 – Part B, Scoring

A non-qualifying (NQ) score is required for the dog’s failure to respond to the first command and /or signal to go to the cone, failure to respond to the first command and/or signal to sit at the cone, failure to sit automatically at the cone, or failure to remain stationary in a sit until directed to move by the handler.

Minor to substantial deductions depending upon the extent shall be made for whining, sniffing, barking, touching the cone with any part of the body except the tail or coat, or for sitting outside the three (3) foot radius of the cone.

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

RA.17.05 Judge Classifications

Approve: DeChant, King, Kissman, Silveira, Wesen

Oppose: Gibson, Gray, Vest

Abstain:

​ ​

Roberts

Motion carries.

Comment from Gibson: It needs to be corrected and resubmitted.

Comment from Kissman: This motion needs to be corrected next month by correcting 15.5.1 by adding the S, senior judge classification.

 

Motion by Wesen

I move to accept the following motion from the Rally Committee.

 

Effective Date: June 1, 2017

 

Motion by Karen Black

Second by Leah Swatko 

I move to identify classifications of judges to be indicated on the Judges Directory.

 

Rationale & Effect: The purpose of this motion is to identify classifications of judges to be indicated on the Judges Directory so clubs who are hosting ASCA Nationals will have clear guidance for who is eligible to judge the National Rally Trial and Rally Finals.

Judges will be affected because they will have to submit a request form to the Business Office to move through the ranks of ASCA Rally judging.

The Business Office will be affected because they will need to verify the information submitted by the judge, confer with the Rally Committee Chair and ultimately make the changes necessary to the judges directory.

Affiliates will be affected as they will be able to easily identify judges eligible to judge Nationals and Finals.

 

Business Office approved on1/20/16.

 

Results of the committee vote:

Approve:  13

Disapprove:  0

Abstain:  0

Non-voting: 0

Comment from Karen Black: Having a system that readily identifies which judges are eligible to judge Nationals and Finals will make decisions for Affiliates hosting Nationals/Finals much easier.  This plan is loosely based on the way conformation judges progress through their ranks.  It has been proven to work for them so we are wanting to implement a similar plan for ASCA Rally Judges.

 

PROPOSED WORDING

15.5 Rally Judge Classifications and Progression

15.5.1 Provisional Judge

a. All judges enter the ASCA Rally Judging ranks as a provisional judge. 

b. A provision judge is able to accept assignments to judge any ASCA sanctioned rally trial, except the National Rally Trial and Rally Finals. 

c. To progress to regular status, the Provisional Judge must submit three complete sets of courses, never before submitted for review, which do not require any mandatory corrections for trials they have been hired to judge. 

d. Once a Provisional Judge submits three sets of courses not requiring mandatory revisions, he/she must submit a change of classification form to the Business Office requesting to be moved to Regular status. The Business Office will verify the information on the form and notify the Rally Committee Chair that the request has been received. A motion will be made at the committee level and upon passing at the committee level will be referred to the Board of Directors for final approval. When final approval is received, the judge will be notified and the judge’s classification on the Judges Directory will be changed to Regular judge.

 

15.5.2 Regular Judge

a. A regular judge is able to accept assignments to judge any ASCA sanctioned rally trial, except the National Rally Trial and Rally Finals. 

b. To progress to National status, the Regular Judge must have completed a Rally Masters title in ASCA.

c. Once a judge completes the titling requirement, he/she must submit a change of classification form to the Business Office requesting to be moved to National status. The Business Office will verify the information on the form and notify the Rally Committee Chair that the request has been received. A motion will be made at the committee level and upon passing at the committee level will be referred to the Board of Directors for final approval. When final approval is received, the judge will be notified and the judge’s classification on the Judges Directory will be changed to National judge.

 

15.5.3 National Judge

a. A National judge is able to accept assignments to judge any ASCA sanctioned rally trial and the National Rally Trial, but is not eligible to judge Rally Finals. 

b. To progress to Senior status, the National Judge must have completed at least five judging assignments for rally trials sanctioned by ASCA.

c. Once a judge completes the judging requirement, he/she must submit a change of classification form to the Business Office requesting to be moved to Senior status. The Business Office will verify the information on the form and notify the Rally Committee Chair that the request has been received.  A motion will be made at the committee level and upon passing at the committee level will be referred to the Board of Directors for final approval.  When final approval is received, the judge will be notified and the judge’s classification on the Judges Directory will be changed to Senior judge.

 

15.5.4 Senior Rally Judge

a. A Senior Rally Judge is able to accept assignments to judge any ASCA sanctioned or sponsored rally trial, including the National Rally Trial and Rally Finals.

 

15.5.5 Request forms for moving to a new judge classification are found in the Appendix of the Rally Rulebook and on the ASCA Website.

 

15.5.6 Multiple requests may be submitted at the same time if the requirements for the requests have been met. For example, if a provisional judge who has already titled a dog to the RM title and submits three sets of courses that do not require mandatory corrections, he/she would be eligible to submit requests to move to Regular and to National judge classification on the same form. Once the approval process is completed, the higher classification will be listed on the Judges Directory.

 

15.5.7 Judges are not required to move to a higher classification if they do not choose to make themselves eligible to judge the National Rally Trial or Rally Finals.

 

The current 15.5 section in the rulebook will become 15.6 and subsequent sections will be numbered accordingly.

 

15.5 Eligible to judge the National Rally Trial and/or Rally Finals List

Host clubs for ASCA Nationals and Finals will look at the Judges Directory to note which Rally judges are eligible to judge the National Rally Trial and Rally Finals.  Judges with a classification letter of “N” (National Judge) are eligible to judge the National Rally Trial.  Judges with a classification letter of “S” (Senior Judge) are eligible to judge the National Rally Trial or Rally Finals.  (Effective June 2017)

 

15.5.1 National Rally Trial

To be eligible to judge the National Rally Trial, a judge must be in good standing with ASCA, and be listed on the current approved ASCA Rally Judges List with a classification of “N”. See section 15.5 for instructions to move from Regular Judge (R) to National Judge (N) on the Judges Directory.

 

15.5.2 Rally Finals

To be eligible to judge Rally Finals, a judge must be in good standing with ASCA, and be listed on the current approved ASCA Rally Judges List with a classification of “S”. See section 15.5 for instructions to move from National Judge (N) to Senior Judge (S) on the Judges Directory.

 

CURRENT WORDING

There currently is no wording in the Rally Rulebook regarding classification of judges beyond regular status.

 

15.5 Eligible to judge the National Rally Trial and/or Rally Finals List

Host clubs for ASCA Nationals and Finals will use the list of eligible judges, available from the Business Office, to select their judge panel for the National Rally trial and for the Rally Finals events. (Effective June 2016)

 

15.5.1 National Rally Trial

To be eligible to judge the National Rally Trial, a judge must be in good standing with ASCA, be listed on the current approved ASCA Rally Judges List, and completed a Rally Masters title in ASCA prior to submitting a request form.

It is the judge’s responsibility to complete the request form and submit it to the Business Office for verification that the judge meets the requirements for judging the National Rally Trial. Once the Business Office verifies the requirements are met, the judge’s name will be added to the list of judges eligible to judge the National Rally Trial.

The Request Form can be found in the Appendix of the Rally Rulebook or online on the ASCA website. (Effective June 2016)

 

15.5.2 Rally Finals

To be eligible to judge Rally Finals, a judge must be in good standing with ASCA, be listed on the current approved ASCA Rally Judges List, and completed a Rally Masters title in ASCA. Judges must also have completed at least five (5) judging assignments prior to submitting a request form.

It is the judge’s responsibility to complete the request form and submit it to the Business Office for verification that the judge meets the requirements for judging Rally Finals. Once the Business office verifies the requirements are met, the judge’s name will be added to the list of judges eligible to judge Rally Finals.

The Request Form can be found in the Appendix of the Rally Rulebook or online on the ASCA website. (Effective June 2016)

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

RA.17.04 Ensuring Courses Meet ASCA Rules and Regulations

Approve: Unanimous

Motion carries.

 

Motion by Wesen

I move to accept the following motion from the Rally Committee.

 

Effective Date: June 1, 2017

 

Motion by Karen Black

Second by Corinne Shanks  

I move to establish guidelines to ensure courses used at ASCA sanctioned or sponsored trials meet ASCA Rules and Regulations.

 

Rationale & Effect: The purpose of this motion is to establish a means for ensuring exhibitors across all of ASCA are competing on courses that meet ASCA guidelines and requirements.

Judges will be affected because they will be held accountable for designing and using courses that meet ASCA rules and regulations and may in some cases need to submit courses prior to trials.

Exhibitors will be affected as they will be assured the courses they compete on will meet ASCA Rules and Regulations.

Rally Course Reviewers will be affected because they will need to review courses timely and track the reviews to maintain a record of courses that meet and do not meet ASCA Rally Rules and Regulations

The Business Office will be affected as they will need to notify judges in the sanctioning letter if their courses must be submitted for pre-trial review.

ASCA as a whole will be affected as titles earned toward Rally, Hall of Fame, Versatility and Performance titles and recognitions will be earned on courses that meet ASCA Rally Rules and Regulations.

 

Business Office approved on 1/17/17.

 

Results of the committee vote:

Approve: 11 (Karen Souza, Karen Black, Claudia Yearsley, Joan Skinner, Ann McCabe, Pat Pierce, Sandy Walroth, Leah Swatko, Guenter Geisel, Corinne Shanks, Beryl Billingsley)

Disapprove: 0

Abstain:  0

Non-voting: 2 (Heidi Iverson, Marianne Kunzmann)

Comment from Pat Pierce: We hope more judges will take advantage of pre-trial course reviews. ASCA Rally has the most complex course design requirements – which makes it a more varied and exciting challenge for handlers trialing on those courses. Finding and correcting design errors before a trial is run, helps ensure all handlers compete and earn legs, scores, titles, Merit Rankings, and Finals Invitations, on correct, legal courses.

Comment from Joan Skinner: Since this is a significant change for all Rally Judges I would recommend that, at least two – four weeks prior to these rules going into effect, a letter be sent to all judges notifying them of the change and including a copy of the new rule book. This will ensure that not only do they have a new rule book but that they have been apprised of the change.

 

PROPOSED WORDING

15.4 Provisional Judge

15.4.1 Provisional Judge

a. The Provisional Judge will be able to accept assignments and judge ASCA Trials as long as their courses are submitted for approval by the ASCA Rally Review Subcommittee at least 30 days prior to each judging assignment. The course reviewers shall review the proposed courses to ensure they are: (1) Safe, (2) Flowing, (3) Appropriately challenging, considering the level for each course, (4) Consistent with the ASCA Rally Philosophy and these Rules and Regulations; (5) Consistent with the ring size and surface and take into account any known obstructions in the ring, i.e. columns, floor grates, etc. Course reviewers are empowered to direct mandatory course revisions to comply with these criteria, as well as to suggest non-mandatory course revisions to improve the challenges, flow, or other aspects of the course or courses. However, course reviewers shall respect the judge’s individuality, and not re-design the provisional judge’s courses solely on the basis of personal preferences. The Course Review Subcommittee will return copies of the proposed courses, together with any mandatory and recommended non-mandatory changes to the provisional judge not later than 15 days prior to the first day of the applicable trial(s). Provisional judges must return a final copy of all courses for the trial including any required /mandatory /recommended changes made on any course to the course reviewer at least 7 days prior to the trial to receive final approval on courses to be used at the trial. Final approval of courses must be obtained in order to judge the trial. To avoid any appearance of a conflict of interest, course reviewers shall not review courses to be used at trials where they expect to compete.

b. All Judges will remain Provisional until such time the Rally Course Review Subcommittee receives three complete sets of courses, not previously submitted for review, that do not need any revisions prior to a Trial in which the Provisional Judge is scheduled to judge. Once a Provisional Judge submits three sets of courses that do not require mandatory changes, the judge may complete the required form requesting a move from provisional to regular status. (Effective June 2017)

c. After moving from provisional to a higher status of judge, in order to avoid the possibility of using courses that do not meet ASCA standards, judges are encouraged and invited to submit their courses at least 30 days prior to using them at trials they have been hired to judge.  Feedback will be provided for the voluntary submissions no later than 15 days prior to the first day of the trial they are judging. (Effective June 2017)

 

16.1.6 Designing Courses That Meet ASCA Requirements

a. It is the Judge’s responsibility to provide courses that meet the ASCA Rally Rules and Regulations at all ASCA sanctioned Trials.

b. If during a post-trial course review it is determined the set of courses used did not follow ASCA’s Rules and Regulations, the judge will be notified and provided details of the determination.  If a second set of courses during the same calendar year is determined to also not comply with ASCA’s Rules and Regulations, the judge and the Business Office will be notified by the ASCA Rally Committee Chair that the judge must submit course sets at least 30 days prior to future judging assignments.  Judges will be notified in the sanctioning letter for future assignments of the need to submit courses for pre-trial course review.  Upon the submission of three pre-trial course sets requiring no mandatory corrections, the judge will be notified they may return to post-trial reviews. (Effective June 2017)

c. To determine if a course meets ASCA Rules and Regulations, a Course Design Checklist will be utilized.  The same checklist is available on the website for judges to use. (Effective June 2017)

d. In order to avoid using courses that do not meet ASCA standards, all judges are encouraged and invited to submit their courses at least 30 days prior to using them at trials they have been hired to judge and to use the Course Design Checklist available on the website.  Feedback will be provided for the voluntary submissions no later than 15 days prior to the first day of the trial they are judging. (Effective June 2017)

 

CURRENT WORDING

15.4 Provisional Judge

15.4.1 Provisional Judge

a. The Provisional Judge will be able to accept assignments and judge ASCA Trials as long as their courses are submitted for approval by the ASCA Rally Review Subcommittee at least 30 days prior to each judging assignment. The course reviewers shall review the proposed courses to ensure they are: (1) Safe, (2) Flowing, (3) Appropriately challenging, considering the level for each course, (4) Consistent with the ASCA Rally Philosophy and these Rules and Regulations; (5) Consistent with the ring size and surface and take into account any known obstructions in the ring, i.e. columns, floor grates, etc. Course reviewers are empowered to direct mandatory course revisions to comply with these criteria, as well as to suggest non- mandatory course revisions to improve the challenges, flow, or other aspects of the course or courses. However, course reviewers shall respect the judge’s individuality, and not re-design the provisional judge’s courses solely on the basis of personal preferences. The Course Review Subcommittee will return copies of the proposed courses, together with any mandatory and recommended non-mandatory changes to the provisional judge not later than 15 days prior to the first day of the applicable trial(s). Provisional judges must return a final copy of all courses for the trial including any required /mandatory /recommended changes made on any course to the course reviewer at least 7 days prior to the trial to receive final approval on courses to be used at the trial. Final approval of courses must be obtained in order to judge the trial. To avoid any appearance of a conflict of interest, course reviewers shall not review courses to be used at trials where they expect to compete. (Effective June 2016)

b. All Judges will remain Provisional until such time the Rally Course Review Subcommittee receives a complete set of courses, not previously submitted for review, (Effective June 2016) that do not need any revisions prior to a Trial in which the Provisional Judge is scheduled to judge. Once a Provisional Judge submits a set of courses that does not need any revisions, the Provisional Judge will be moved to Approved Status and will no longer need to have their courses approved prior to assignments.

c. At the direction of the ASCA Board of Directors, a judge may be moved from approved status to provisional if it is determined it is in the judge’s best interest and ASCA’s best interest for the judge to submit courses to the Rally Course Review Subcommittee for approval as described above in 15.4.1 a.

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

RA.17.03 Continuing Education

Approve: Unanimous

Motion carries.

 

Motion by Wesen

I move to accept this motion from the Rally Committee.

 

Effective Date: June 1, 2017

 

Motion by Karen Black

Second by Heidi Iverson

I move to make continuing education for judges a requirement every two years.

 

Rationale & Effect: The purpose of this motion is to establish a more consistent method of ensuring all ASCA Rally Judges receive continuing education that is easy to track by the Business Office.

Judges will be affected because they will need to participate in a Judges Education Seminar every 2 years instead of every 3 years and will be held accountable for completing the education in a timely manner.

The Business Office will be affected as they will have to send out initial notices on odd numbered years and follow-up contacts for judges who haven’t returned their completed supplemental packets by mid-February in education years.

The Rally Committee is affected as the continuing education videos and supplemental packets must be updated regularly.

 

Business Office approved on 12/21/2016.

 

Results of the committee vote:

Approve: 13

Disapprove: 0

Abstain: 0

Non-Voting: 0

 

PROPOSED WORDING

15.6 Continuing Education Requirements for all ASCA Rally Judges

15.6.1 Staying Up to Date on Rules

It is the responsibility of all ASCA Rally judges to stay up to date on the current rules and regulations affecting the ASCA Rally program. Rule Books will be updated and reprinted June 1 of each calendar year. Individual program rulebooks may be updated and reprinted January 1 of the same calendar year if deemed necessary by the Board of Directors. Only those program rules contained in the latest version of each rule book shall be enforceable.

 

15.6.2 ASCA Rally Judges Seminar

Judges must participate in the ASCA Rally Judges Seminar online and/or in person at least once every three years. Failure to complete the Rally Judges Seminar will result in the suspension of all Rally judging privileges until the requirement is fulfilled.

All ASCA Rally Judges will be required to participate in the ASCA Rally Judges Education Seminar online or in person at least every two years.  A notice will be sent by the Business Office to all ASCA Rally Judges during the first week of January in odd-numbered years (i.e. 2017, 2019, etc.).  All sections in the Supplemental Packet must be answered correctly to receive credit for participating in the seminar. The completed Supplemental Packet must be returned to the Business Office within 60 days of the distribution date of the notice from the Business Office.  The seminar may be watched repeatedly and Supplemental Packet resubmitted repeatedly until all questions are answered correctly.  In mid-February of odd numbered years, the Business Office will contact any judge who has not returned his/her Supplemental Packet to assure that the exam was received. Judges not returning the completed Supplemental Packet by the deadline will be removed from the approved ASCA Judges Directory and will need to reapply if they choose to judge ASCA Rally again in the future.

Judges who participate in the Judges Seminar at ASCA Nationals in the fall of an even-numbered year (i.e. 2016, 2018, etc.), will receive credit for completing their 2-year continuing education provided they submit a completed Supplemental Packet with all questions answered correctly to the Business Office within 60 days of the live seminar.

New ASCA Rally judges who completed their application process in the last quarter of an even-numbered year (i.e. 2016, 2018, etc.) will receive credit for completing their 2-year continuing education during their application process.

 

CURRENT WORDING

15.6 Continuing Education Requirements for all ASCA Rally Judges

15.6.1 Staying Up to Date on Rules

It is the responsibility of all ASCA Rally judges to stay up to date on the current rules and regulations affecting the ASCA Rally program. Rule Books will be updated and reprinted June 1 of each calendar year. Individual program rulebooks may be updated and reprinted January 1 of the same calendar year if deemed necessary by the Board of Directors. Only those program rules contained in the latest version of each rule book shall be enforceable.

 

15.6.2 ASCA Rally Judges Seminar

Judges must participate in the ASCA Rally Judges Seminar online and/or in person at least once every three years. Failure to complete the Rally Judges Seminar will result in the suspension of all Rally judging privileges until the requirement is fulfilled.

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

SD.17.05 Chapter 15, Course G

Approve: Unanimous

Motion carries.

 

Motion by Gibson

I move to accept the recommendation of the Stockdog Committee to change the position of the obstacles listed in Course G to remove the congestion found with the existing rule placement of the obstacles, as outlined below.

 

Effective Date: June 1, 2017

 

Motion by Dan Sanderson

Second by James Bergert

 

Rationale: The current positioning of panels and handler lines places different obstacles too close to each other and too close to the handler line, which results in confusion. When the motion for Course G was originally made, an incorrect layout was inadvertently submitted. This re-positioning of the obstacles and the handler lines provides a course that is easily understood and less confusing for the contestant.

 

Results of the committee vote:

Approve: 12

Disapprove: None

Abstain: 1

Non-Voting: None

Comment from Sanderson: The current layout of obstacles places obstacle 1 and obstacle 3 too close together. Separating the obstacles makes it much clearer and creates a more uniform course.

Comment from Schetterer: I think the changes make sense and am looking forward to running G Course with these modified measurements.

 

PROPOSED WORDING

15 Chapter 15: Arena Trial Course G (Effective June 2016)

15.1 Section 1: Course G

15.1.1 Course G Arena

a. Set-up: The arenas will be set up with panels and pens positioned as outlined in the diagram and described in this section. This course may be run with a take pen or gather, depending on the facility, and may be run in either direction by reversing the placement of the obstacles as shown in the diagrams.

b. Panels:

1. Cattle and Sheep/Goat panels will be 8’-12’ in length and at least 4’ high. For arenas 100’-124’ in width, 8’ panels are recommended. Arenas 125’or wider, 8’-12- panels may be used. All openings will be 10’.

2. Ducks/Geese arena panels will be 4-5 feet long and at least 2 feet high. Openings between panels will be 6’.

EXCEPTION: The panel length for the free-standing Pen (obstacle 4) for Sheep/Cattle must be 12’-16’in length and at least 4’ high. 16’ panels are preferred. The free-standing pen for Ducks/Geese will be from 4’ by 4’ to 6’ by 6’.

c. Sequence (for a left hand pen): Take pen/gather (5 course points and 10 control points); drive/fetch through obstacle 1 by driving or fetching the stock up the middle of the arena to the entrance of obstacle 1 (5 course points and 20 control points). The transition from control points for take pen/gather to control points for obstacle 1 is approximately half the distance between the re-pen fence and obstacle 1. Cross drive/fetch the stock through obstacle 2 in a counter-clock wise direction (5 course points and 10 control points). Continue to drive or fetch the stock in a counter-clockwise direction to the entrance of obstacle 3 (5 course points and 20 control points). Then exit obstacle 3, turn in the direction of the Advanced Handler Line and SET-UP and control to obstacle 4 (Freestanding pen). Advanced and Open will proceed to the free-standing pen (5 course points and 25 control points, not for Started); and then to the re-pen (5 course points and 10 control points. Not for Started), Started will proceed from obstacle 3 exit, then to the re-pen (5 course points and 10 control points, Started only). The sequence of events shall be as follows: take pen or gather, obstacle 1, obstacle 2, obstacle 3, pen (not for started) and re-pen. Obstacles 1, 2, and 3 must be attempted before attempting the free standing pen as described in Chapter 8, Section 2.3. No points will be awarded for the freestanding pen for started dogs. EXCEPTION: The Course may be reversed by reversing the placement of the obstacles. This Course is designed to be run in either direction.

d. Take pen: The take pen does not have to be the same enclosure as the re-pen as long as the procedure is consistent for the entire trial and both pens are at the same end of the arena. The take pen and/or re-pen shall be placed on the outside of the arena on the fence. The take pen gate must be closed after the stock is released into the arena. If the Judge, in consultation with the Course Director, decides that the take pen is not of adequate size and/or construction to be safe for the dog or the livestock, the cattle or sheep/goats will be released into the arena from the take pen. When using a gather the Advanced handlers must position themselves at the Advanced Handler Line on the take-pen side of the line, where ever they feel it is best to take control of the stock to move them up the middle of the arena. The handler is free to move after the dog has been sent as long as it is on the take-pen side of the Advanced Handler line. Open and Started handlers may position themselves where ever they feel it is best to take control of the stock to move it up the middle of the arena. The Open handler is free to move after the dog has been sent as long as it is on the take-pen side of the Open Handler line.  The Started Handler may move anywhere in the arena.

Cattle and Sheep/goats: The take pen shall be of adequate size to allow the dog to remove the livestock safely. The livestock size, number, and demeanor will determine the necessary size of each take pen. The livestock should not take up more than 1/3 of the take pen area. It is suggested that the minimum size be no less than 250 square feet with a maximum size of 900 square feet. The take pen gate shall be no less than 8’.

Ducks/Geese: The take pen shall be a minimum of 8’-8’ and a maximum of 16’-16’.

e. Obstacle 1: Consists of two panels with a 10’ opening positioned at a 45 degree angle, with the center of the opening 40’ from the fence opposite the re-pen end of the arena and 25’ from the side fence. The stock must move through the panel opening from the take pen side of the arena towards the top of the arena. When at least one head of stock passes through the panels, then no further course points can be counted. To receive course points for obstacle 1, at least one head of livestock must pass the plane of the panels. If the stock passes through the panels from the wrong direction, at least one head must be driven past the plane of the inline panels so that daylight can be seen by the Judge between the line and the stock. Only those head of stock that clear the daylight line will count for Course points. The stock then must be turned around to attempt the obstacle in the correct direction. Ability to control livestock points for this work will be subject to the manner in which the movements around the obstacle were executed.

Ducks/Geese: the center of the opening is 12’ from the fence opposite the re-pen end of the arena and 10’ from the side fence.

f. Obstacle 2: Consists of one panel, positioned 25’ from and parallel to the back fence with a 10’ foot opening between the left end of the panel and the left hand side of the arena (See drawing for clarification). The stock must move through the entrance from the top end of the arena towards the re-pen end of the arena. When at least one head of stock passes through the panels, then no further course points can be counted. To receive course points, at least one head of livestock must pass the plane between the in-line panels. If the stock passes through the obstacle from the wrong direction, at least one head must be driven past the plane of the in-line panels so that daylight can be seen by the Judge between the line and the stock. Only those head of stock that clear the daylight line will count for Course points. The stock then must be turned around to attempt the obstacle in the correct direction. Ability to control livestock points for this work will be subject to the manner in which the movements around the obstacle were executed.

Ducks/Geese: the panel is placed 8’ from and parallel to the back fence with a 6’ opening between the left end of the panel and the left hand side of the arena.

g. Obstacle 3: Consists of two in-line panels with a 10’ opening. The end of the panel closest to the re-pen end of the arena will be placed 15’ above the Advanced Handler Line (opposite the re-pen end of the arena) and 25’ from and parallel to the right side arena fence. The stock must move from left to right for the exit. To receive course points, at least one head of livestock must pass the plane between the in-line panels. Only livestock that has cleared the opening of obstacle 3 when the gate on obstacle 4 (free-standing Pen) is opened will earn course points.  If the stock passes through the obstacle from the wrong direction, at least one head must be driven past the plane of the in-line panels so that daylight can be seen by the Judge between the line and the stock. Only those head of stock that clear the daylight line will count for Course points. The stock then must be turned around to attempt the obstacle in the correct direction. Ability to control livestock points for this work will be subject to the manner in which the movements around the obstacle were executed. Ducks/Geese: The end of the panel closest to the re-pen end of the arena will be placed with the bottom end of the lower panel on and extending above the Advanced Handler Line (opposite the re-pen end of the arena) and 10’ from and parallel to the right side arena fence.

h. Obstacle 4 – Free-Standing Pen: The free-standing pen is made up of three sides and a gate and is positioned below (on the re-pen side of the Advanced Handler Line) the Advanced Handler Line, extending toward the re-pen end of the arena. The left hand side of the pen is positioned 20’ from the left side fence of the arena. The gate will open in a downward manner, swinging toward the re-pen end of the arena. The pen must be made of slatted material (no solid pens). The gate must be hinged to allow for free swinging. The gate may be opened when the last head of livestock clears the opening of obstacle 3. The dog is to put the stock into the pen and the handler is to close the gate in order to receive course points. Obstacles 1, 2, and 3 must be attempted before attempting the freestanding pen as described in Chapter 8, Section 2.3. The handler may assist the dog in bringing the stock out of the freestanding pen without penalty. The handlers are not required to stay at the gate while panning. Advanced handlers must, while attempting the freestanding pen, stay behind the Open Handler’s Line, otherwise the 50% Advanced Handler’s penalty will be applied. Ability to control livestock points for this work will be subject to the manner in which this pen was completed.

Ducks/Geese: The free-standing pen is positioned below (on the re-pen side) of the Advanced Handler Line, extending toward the re-pen end of the arena. The left hand side of the pen positioned 20’ from the left side fence of the arena.

i. Re-pen: The re-pen may be the same pen as the take pen. The re-pen does not have to be the same enclosure as the take pen as long as the procedure is consistent for the entire trial and both pens are at the same end of the arena. When the re-pen gate is opened, no further points can be earned on any other part of the course. Points for the re-pen may be earned after completing or attempting the exit for obstacle 1. Ability to control livestock points for this work will be subject to the manner in which movement through the obstacle was executed.

j. Handler Lines: Both handler lines are measured from the center of the opening of obstacle 1. The Advanced handler line is 110’ from the center of the opening of obstacle 1. The Open Hander Line is 20’ from the center of the opening of obstacle 1. Both lines will extend across the width of the arena, parallel to the fence opposite the re-pen. Started Handlers may move anywhere in the arena at any time.

Ducks/Geese: Both handler lines are measured from the center of the opening of obstacle 1. The Advanced handler line is 45’ from the center of the opening of obstacle 1. The Open Hander Line is 8’ from the center of the opening of obstacle 1.

 

CURRENT WORDING

15 Chapter 15: Arena Trial Course G (Effective June 2016)

15.1 Section 1: Course G

15.1.1 Course G Arena

a. Set-up: The arenas will be set up with panels and pens positioned as outlined in the diagram and described in this section. This course may be run with a take pen or gather, depending on the facility, and may be run in either direction by reversing the placement of the obstacles as shown in the diagrams.

b. Panels:

1. Cattle and Sheep/Goat panels will be 8’-12’ in length and at least 4’ high. For arenas 100’-124’ in width, 8’ panels are recommended. Arenas 125’or wider, 8’-12- panels may be used. All openings will be 10’.

2. Ducks/Geese arena panels will be 4-5 feet long and at least 2 feet high. Openings between panels will be 6’. Pen will be from 4’ by 4’ to 6’ by 6’. All openings will be 4’. EXCEPTION: The panel length for the Free-Standing Pen (obstacle 4) for sheep/cattle must be 12’-16’in length and at least 4’ high. 16’ panels are preferred.

c. Sequence (for a left hand pen): Take pen/gather (5 course points and 10 control points); drive/fetch through obstacle 1 by driving or fetching the stock up the middle of the arena to the entrance of obstacle 1 (5 course points and 20 control points). The transition from control points for take pen/gather to control points for obstacle 1 is approximately half the distance between the re-pen fence and obstacle 1. Cross drive/fetch the stock through obstacle 2 in a counter-clock wise direction (5 course points and 10 control points). Continue to drive or fetch the stock in a counter-clockwise direction to the entrance of obstacle 3 (5 course points and 20 control points). Then exit obstacle 3 and SET-UP and control to obstacle 4 (Freestanding pen). Advanced and Open will proceed to the free-standing pen (5 course points and 25 control points, not for Started); and then to the re-pen (5 course points and 10 control points. Not for Started), Started will proceed from obstacle 3 exit then to the re-pen (5 course points and 10 control points, Started only). The sequence of events shall be as follows: take pen or gather, obstacle 1, obstacle 2, obstacle 3, pen (not for started) and re-pen. Obstacles 1, 2, and 3 must be attempted before attempting the free standing pen as described in Chapter 8, Section 2.3. No points will be awarded for the freestanding pen for started dogs. EXCEPTION: The Course may be reversed by reversing the placement of the obstacles. This Course is designed to be run in either direction.

d. Take pen: The take pen does not have to be the same enclosure as the re-pen as long as the procedure is consistent for the entire trial and both pens are at the same end of the arena. The take pen gate must be closed after the stock is released into the arena. If the Judge, in consultation with the Course Director, decides that the take pen is not of adequate size and/or construction to be safe for the dog or the livestock, the cattle or sheep/goats will be released into the arena from the take pen. When using a gather the Advanced handlers must position themselves at the Advanced Handler Line on the take-pen side of the line, where ever they feel it is best to take control of the stock to move them up the middle of the arena. The handler is free to move after the dog has been sent as long as it is on the take-pen side of the Advanced Handler line. Open and Started handlers may position themselves where ever they feel it is best to take control of the stock to move it up the middle of the arena. Open handlers’ line is in effect for the Open division. The take pen and/or re-pen shall be placed on the outside of the arena on the fence. Cattle and Sheep/goats: The take pen shall be of adequate size to allow the dog to remove the livestock safely. The livestock size, number, and demeanor will determine the necessary size of each take pen. The livestock should not take up more than 1/3 of the take pen area. It is suggested that the minimum size be no less than 250 square feet with a maximum size of 900 square feet. The take pen gate shall be no less than 8’. Ducks/Geese: The take pen shall be a minimum of 8’-8’ and a maximum of 16’-16’.

e. Obstacle 1: Obstacle 1 is positioned at a 45 degree angle, with the upper left hand corner set 40’ from the fence opposite the re-pen end of the arena. The lower right corner is set 15’ from the right side fence (See drawing for clarification). The stock must move through the panel opening from the take pen side of the 61 arena towards the top of the arena. When at least one head of stock passes through the panels, then no further course points can be counted. To receive course points for obstacle 1, at least one head of livestock must pass the plane of the panels. If the stock passes through the panels from the wrong direction, at least one head must be driven past the plane of the inline panels so that daylight can be seen by the Judge between the line and the stock. Only those head of stock that clear the daylight line will count for Course points. The stock then must be turned around to attempt the obstacle in the correct direction. Ability to control livestock points for this work will be subject to the manner in which the movements around the obstacle were executed. Ducks/Geese: the upper left hand corner is set 15’ from the fence opposite the re-pen end of the arena. The lower right corner is set 10’ from the right side fence.

f. Obstacle 2: Consists of one panel, positioned 25’ from and parallel to the back fence with a 10’ foot opening between the left end of the panel and the left hand side of the arena (See drawing for clarification). The stock must move through the entrance from the top end of the arena towards the repen end of the arena. When at least one head of stock passes through the panels, then no further course points can be counted. To receive course points, at least one head of livestock must pass the plane between the in-line panels. If the stock passes through the obstacle from the wrong direction, at least one head must be driven past the plane of the in-line panels so that daylight can be seen by the Judge between the line and the stock. Only those head of stock that clear the daylight line will count for Course points. The stock then must be turned around to attempt the obstacle in the correct direction. Ability to control livestock points for this work will be subject to the manner in which the movements around the obstacle were executed. Ducks/Geese: the panel is placed 10’ from and parallel to the back fence with a 6’ opening between the left end of the panel and the left hand side of the arena.

g. Obstacle 3: There are two in-line panels that have a 10’ opening. The end of the panel closest to the repen end of the arena will be placed 20’ above the Advanced Handler Line (opposite the re-pen end of the arena) and 15’from and parallel to the right side arena fence. The stock must move from left to right for the exit. To receive course points, at least one head of livestock must pass the plane between the in-line panels. Only livestock that have cleared the opening of obstacle 3 when the gate on obstacle 4 (FreeStanding Pen) is opened will earn course points. If the stock passes through the obstacle from the wrong direction, at least one head must be driven past the plane of the in-line panels so that daylight can be seen by the Judge between the line and the stock. Only those head of stock that clear the daylight line will count for Course points. The stock then must be turned around to attempt the obstacle in the correct direction. Ability to control livestock points for this work will be subject to the manner in which the movements around the obstacle were executed. Ducks/Geese: The end of the panel closest to the re-pen end of the arena will be placed with the bottom end of the lower panel on and extending above the Advanced Handler Line (opposite the re-pen end of the arena) and 10’ from and parallel to the right side arena fence.

h. Obstacle 4 – Free-Standing Pen: The free-standing pen is made up of three sides and a gate and is positioned 15’ below (on the re-pen side of the Advanced Handler Line) the Advanced Handler Line with the left hand side of the pen positioned 20’ from the left side fence of the arena. The gate will open in a downward manner, swinging toward the re-pen end of the arena. The pen must be made of slatted material (no solid pens). The gate must be hinged to allow for free swinging. The gate may be opened when the last head of livestock clears the opening of obstacle 3. The dog is to put the stock into the pen and the handler is to close the gate in order to receive course points. Obstacles 1, 2, and 3 must be attempted before attempting the freestanding pen as described in Chapter 8, Section 2.3. The handler may assist the dog in bringing the stock out of the freestanding pen without penalty. Handlers are not required to stay at the gate while penning. Advanced handlers must, while attempting the freestanding pen, stay behind the Open Handler’s Line, otherwise the 50% Advanced Handler’s penalty will be applied. Ability to control livestock points for this work will be subject to the manner in which this pen was completed. Ducks/Geese: The free-standing pen is positioned 20’ below (on the re-pen side) of the Advanced Handler Line with the left hand side of the pen positioned 20’ from the left side fence of the arena.

i. Re-pen: The re-pen may be the same pen as the take pen. The re-pen does not have to be the same enclosure as the take pen as long as the procedure is consistent for the entire trial and both pens are at the same end of the arena. When the re-pen gate is opened, no further points can be earned on any other part of the course. Points for the re-pen may be earned after completing or attempting the exit for obstacle 1. Ability to control livestock points for this work will be subject to the manner in which movement through the obstacle was executed. j. Handler Lines: The Advanced handler line shall be determined by the length of the arena with a maximum distance of 125’. Measure half the length of the arena down from obstacle 2 toward the re-pen end of the arena and across the arena. Advanced Handlers’ Line in an arena with greater than 250’ length shall not exceed 125’. The Open Handlers’ Line will be placed at the lower right hand corner of obstacle 1 and across the width of the arena. Both lines will extend across the width of the arena, parallel to the fence opposite the re-pen. Started Handlers may move anywhere in the arena at any time. Ducks/Geese: The Advanced Handler Line will be determined by the same method. The Open Handler Line will be placed at the lower right hand corner of obstacle 1 and across the width of the arena, parallel to the fence opposite the re-pen end of the arena.

 

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

SD.17.04 Chapter 18.8.3 Qualifying Score

Approve: Gibson, Gray, King, Kissman, Silveira

Oppose: Roberts, Vest, Wesen

Abstain: None

Non-Voting: DeChant

Motion carries.

Comment from Vest: This motion is redundant in that it states that it is the Judge’s discretion as to how to judge the handler and dog… that is what we already do. If the motion had stopped after this statement “The handler needs to complete each task, in the proper order, as stated in the description to qualify” I could have supported, but the addition of the last statement is quite frankly too much micromanaging. The FT program was supposed to emulate real farm work and there are times that I and everyone else have had things happen that we did not plan… SD Judges already know how to judge those occurrences.

 

Motion by Gibson

I move to accept the Stockdog Committee’s recommendation to change the wording in Chapter 18, section 8.3 regarding the Qualifying Score in the Farm Trial, as outlined below.

 

Motion by Judy DeShazo

Second by Wayne Kirby

 

Effective Date: June 1, 2017

 

Rationale: We feel that clarification of wording is needed for the 2017 ASCA stockdog rulebook regarding scoring of the farm trial.

 

Results of the committee vote:

Approve: 11

Disapprove: 2

Abstain: None

Non-Voting: None

Comment from Parrish: I think this is written incorrectly and can be misinterpreted.

Comment from Schetterer: I have numerous problems with this motion.
First off the concept of this motion was introduced with little warning or discussion at the end of December. As part of the subcommittee that was formed to discuss changes in the FTD, this was never discussed. In my opinion, the wording of the motion and where it is placed in the rules reflects this lack of discussion. I feel that words matter and where they are placed matters even more.
Breaking the new wording down.
“The handler needs to complete each task, in the proper order, as stated in the description to qualify.” The FTD was not designed for judge to decided if the handler qualified to earn a qualifying score. Judges are supposed to be judging the dog and the handler working as a team, not just the handler. On an even more picky interpretation, what description are we talking about?
Second part, “At the Judge’s discretion, points may be deducted for handler assistance or minimal work by the dog.” The section this proposed new wording wants to modify is in the section regarding “Qualifying Score”. As soon as the words “At the Judge’s discretion” are mentioned, in my opinion, this proposed wording needs to be moved to a subsection of 18.10 Section 10: Judging Criteria.
Finally, I have no problem clarifying that judges should not award a qualifying if they think the dog and handler did not follow the order in which each task was described in the premium or on the scoresheet. Even though it is implied, clarifying it would not hurt.
As far as the words “complete each task…as stated in the description to qualify”, again, I feel that this Judging Criteria.
If a judge does not think a task was completed as described in the premium and/or scoresheet, then that judge should interpret and score for what was accomplished for that task. To expound further at the expense of being redundant…
If the task was not attempted than a zero should be awarded for that task, however if the task was attempted, AND there was no requirement described in the premium and/or scoresheet that said task had to be fully completed before moving on to the next one, then a score should be awarded for that task.
The wording and placement for this motion needs further discussion and therefore I am voting no.

 

PROPOSED WORDING

18.8.3 Qualifying Score

Open and Advanced Farm Trial Dogs must earn 91 or more out of 130 possible points to receive a qualifying score. If any task receives a score of zero, the run shall not qualify even if a score of 91 or higher is achieved. The handler needs to complete each task, in the proper order, as stated in the description to qualify. At the Judge’s discretion, points may be deducted for handler assistance or minimal work by the dog.

 

CURRENT WORDING

18.8.3 Qualifying Score

Open and Advanced Farm Trial Dogs must earn 91 or more out of 130 possible points to receive a qualifying score. If any task receives a score of zero, the run shall not qualify even if a score of 91 or higher is achieved.

 

 

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

SD.17.03 Chapter 18, Section 7.1 d. The Farm Trial Course

Approve: Unanimous

Motion carries.

 

Motion by Gibson

I move to accept the Stockdog Committee’s recommendation to add wording for clarification to Chapter 18, section 7.1 d regarding the tasks of the mixed farm trial, as outlined below.

 

Effective Date: June 1, 2017

 

Motion by Judy DeShazo

Second by Wayne Kirby

 

Rationale: We feel that clarification is needed for the ASCA Stockdog 2017 rule book regarding the tasks of a mixed farm trial.

 

Results of the committee vote:

Approve: 13

Disapprove: None

Abstain: None

Non-Voting: None

Comment from Schetterer: The wording clarifies something that should have been addressed in the original FTD proposal.

 

PROPOSED WORDING

18.7.1 The Course

Because of the varying setups of farms around the country, no two farm trial courses will necessarily be the same. Each course should be designed to showcase the working ability of the Australian Shepherd in the day to day tasks that happen on many farms. The course should not be overly complicated and should try to represent practical work type situations where a dog needs to move stock in an efficient and stress-free manner.

a. The course designer must take into account the increased difficulty for each division (OFTD, AFTD) when developing the course.

b. At least three tasks (including the gather) must have requirements increasing the difficulty between Open and Advanced. Ways to increase difficulty can include, but are not limited to, length of gather, sorts of marked animals, advanced pen/chute work, handler lines, use of drives, use of task(s) that are specific to a division, etc.

c. The difference between an open and advanced task can be in any part of the task including the designated task itself and/or any part leading up to or leaving the task.

d. When running a mixed farm trial, each class of stock must complete a minimum of three separate tasks.

 

CURRENT WORDING

18.7.1 The Course

Because of the varying setups of farms around the country, no two farm trial courses will necessarily be the same. Each course should be designed to showcase the working ability of the Australian Shepherd in the day to day tasks that happen on many farms. The course should not be overly complicated and should try to represent practical work type situations where a dog needs to move stock in an efficient and stress-free manner.

a. The course designer must take into account the increased difficulty for each division (OFTD, AFTD) when developing the course.

b. At least three tasks (including the gather) must have requirements increasing the difficulty between Open and Advanced. Ways to increase difficulty can include, but are not limited to, length of gather, sorts of marked animals, advanced pen/chute work, handler lines, use of drives, use of task(s) that are specific to a division, etc.

c. The difference between an open and advanced task can be in any part of the task including the designated task itself and/or any part leading up to or leaving the task.

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

SD.17.02 Chapter 28, Section 3.7

Approve: Gibson, Kissman, Roberts, Silveira, Vest, Wesen

Oppose: DeChant, King

Abstain: Gray

Non-Voting: None

Motion carries.

 

Motion by Gibson

I move to accept the Stockdog Committee’s recommendation to include Ranch Trial Sheep and Ranch Trial Cattle titles as an alternative to the Farm Trial title requirements for becoming an ASCA Stockdog Apprentice, as outlined below.

 

Effective Date: June 1, 2017

 

Motion by Marti Parrish

Second by Jim McKay

 

Rationale: The experience earned from competing in the Ranch Trial Program should be considered as valuable as that coming from the Farm Trial Program.

 

Results of the committee vote:

Approve: 7

Disapprove: 4

Abstain: 2

Non-Voting: None

Comment from Fusi: On the rules, RTD title seems much more easy to earn of an ADV farm trial title. Maybe before, it would need a revision of the RTD program too.

Comment from Alexander: A ranch trial cattle requires only one leg and a ranch trial sheep requires only one leg… (Two legs total). An advanced Farm trial cattle requires 4 legs from start to finish as does an advanced sheep or mixed farm trial title. (total of 8 legs) I believe all new judges coming into the program should have knowledge and experience of both AFTD courses and RTD.

Comment from Schetterer: Since the original concept of the Farm Trial Program came about from the Ranch Trial Program, I have no problem voting yes on this motion.

Comment from Sanderson: The intent of increasing the requirements for becoming a Judge was to slow the process down to ensure that those who applied had spent enough time in the program before entering the judging program. The Farm Trial requirements require the applicant to earn 4 titles in each stock, or 8 total. With the substitution of Ranch Titles the applicant only needs 1 qualifying score to reach the same requirements. It is defeating the purpose of the original intent.

 

PROPOSED WORDING

28.3.7

The applicant must have earned titles on two different types of livestock from either, or the combination of, the Advanced Farm Trial division and the Ranch Trial Program.

 

CURRENT WORDING

28.3.7

The applicant must have earned Advanced Titles on at least two different types of stock in the Farm Trial division.

 

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

SD.17.01 Chapter 18, Section 7.3 a,b  Required Tasks in Farm Trial

Approve: Gibson, Gray, King

Oppose: DeChant, Kissman, Roberts, Silveira, Vest, Wesen

Motion fails.

Comment from Kissman: More thought should be put into the gate sort.

Comment from Roberts: I agree with the dissent from the SDC on this motion.

Comment from Silveira: I concur with the Committee Member’s dissent opinion. The Farm Trial program was designed to use farms as they are set up.

Comment from Vest: Do not support this motion as it did not remove unnecessary requirements from the Farm Trial program.  The original Farm Trial program was based upon the premise that each Farm Trial was to use the equipment/setup at each farm.  To continue to require a gate sort… some farms use races… and marked stock requires additional equipment/labor that should not be necessary for hosting a Farm Trial.  It was also our understanding that this motion was going to reduce the use of number of pens that require stock to be uselessly moved in and out, only reduced by quantity 1… and now does not allow the re-pen to be used as a pen.

Comment from Wesen: I like 3 pens and separation of task per stock. However, a gate sort has been challenge in parts of the country.

 

Motion by Gibson

I move to accept the Stockdog Committee’s recommendation to change the wording in Chapter 18, section 7.3 regarding the Required Tasks in the Farm Trial, as outlined below. 

 

Effective Date: June 1, 2017

 

Motion by Judy DeShazo

Second by Wayne Kirby

 

Rationale: The current wording of 18.7.3a and 18.7.3b needs changes and clarification for the 2017 Stockdog rule book. The current wording is not clear and causes confusion and undue hardship when both designing a farm trial and when trying to approve a farm trial.

 

Results of the committee vote:

Approve: 10

Disapprove: 3

Abstain: None

Non-Voting: None

Comment from Bowman: With this wording stock will be put in & out of pens to meet the requirements of the course. The purpose of the farm trial program should be to simulate actual work where the job at hand determines what is done.

Comment from Parrish: I do not believe the open dogs must sort designated or marked livestock. But should be allowed to sort any especially depending upon the type of livestock being worked. And the way to sort ducks is not by a gate sort – especially marked ones. 

Comment from Schetterer: First off I have a point of order on this motion. The title of this motion does reflect the motion being voted on. As part of the sub-committee that was tasked to make revisions to the FTD, I was not consulted on how to present this motion to the SDC. That being said…
The title of this motion is Chapter 18, Section 7.3 a,b  Required Tasks/Pen Work in Farm Trial
Chapter 18.7.3 subsection “a” is named “Pen Work”
Chapter 18.7.3 subsection “b” is named “Sorting”
This motion combines subsection “a” & “b” together but yet the title does not reflect that. I feel that these should be 2 different motions and on that alone I feel that this motion should be voted against.
Technical/point of order reasons aside I am VERY against this motion. In short, the changes to subsection “a” and “b” that were made by previous Stockdog Committees, were asked to be reviewed by a sub-committee that I was part of.
Changes to subsection “a” were discussed to change the number of pens from 4 to 3. I don’t have a overwhelming objection to this change because it brings it closer to the original proposal. I still don’t agree that we should add a 3rd or 4th pen just because. Remember that the RTD (which the FTD was based upon) does not require a 3rd or 4th pen.
Subsection “b” I have the most problem with. Current rules DICTATE a gate sort regardless of the facility. I feel that this is problem because the original FTD proposal was based off the RTD which does not have a gate sort requirement. I have no problem having a gate sort being a “preferred way’ of sorting but not the ONLY way of sorting livestock.
The whole idea of the FTD was to create a program for our ASCA Stockdog participants “looking for varied and challenging courses outside of the trial arena” It was also created to be “built on a smaller scale than the Ranch Trial, in both area size and stock numbers. This difference makes it more easily sanctioned by clubs that may be greatly limited in their capacity to host Ranch Trials.” We wanted affiliates to be able to run a FTD without significantly changing existing faculty layouts and to encourage Stockmanship that we felt was being lost by just doing “arena trials” I have an included a definition of stockmanship for reference.
“Stockmanship is the knowledgeable and skillful handling of livestock in a safe, efficient, effective, and low stress manner with the intent of enhancing ranch profitability and improving animal welfare.”
Anytime you bring livestock, handler, and dog into close quarters you decrease the level of safety and increase the level of stress. Sorting livestock at any facility is VERY unique to that facility. Livestock that has been accustomed to a gate sort will not behave the same way when being presented to a sorting race with a 2 or 3 sort gate and vice versa.
By setting a rule that DICTATES a gate sort, ASCA and the SDC are potentially overriding safety issues that facilities might have mitigated by using a different type of sort method. Affiliate Course Directors that are designing FTD courses should have the flexibility to decide what sort method, with the SDC approval, they should use.
The main argument against flexibility of what sort method is used, is the level of difficulty. Since the FTD was designed to be unique (with some common tasks) to each facility, the level of difficulty can never be EXACTLY the same. (Which is why the FTD is not a requirement for a WTCH or HOF) Again, part of the reason the FTD was proposed was to encourage Stockmanship (see definition above) not just increase the level of difficulty for tasks over the safety, efficiency of getting the task accomplished, and the stress of livestock.
Finally, a sort is a based upon teamwork between dog and handler. Regardless of what sort method is used, judges should be able to score how well both handler dog work together to accomplish the task efficiently (amount of time could be used for example) and safely.

 

PROPOSED WORDING

18.7.3 a, b Required Tasks

a. Pen Work: A minimum of three pens must be completed. A pen shall be big enough for a dog to work safely around the livestock but small enough that the sense of a pen is established. An arena, pasture, or other area not giving the feel of a pen will not be accepted. For each pen to be completed, livestock must be both placed in and removed from the pen. Exhausting the stock at the end of the course will not count towards the required pens. The work may include, but is not limited to, moving the stock from one pen to another. The dog should work primarily on its own in the pens. The dog remaining stationary while the handler removes the stock from the pen will not fulfill the pen work requirement. Points will be divided between the pens with the club designating on the course description the point value of each individual pen.

b. Sorting: At least one gate sort is required during the course, regardless of division or class of stock. A sort of at least 3 marked or designated animals is required. The dog and handler will work together during the sort.

 

CURRENT WORDING

18.7.3 Required Tasks

a. Pen Work: Minimum of four pens needed. A pen shall be big enough for a dog to safely work around the livestock but small enough that the sense of a pen is established. An arena, pasture, large round pen, large corral or other area not giving the feel of a pen will not be accepted. The work may include, but is not limited to, moving the stock from one pen to another. The dog should work primarily on its own in the pens. The dog remaining stationary while the handler removes the stock from the pen will not fulfill the pen work requirement. Exhausting the stock at the end of the course will not count towards the required pens. Points will be divided between the pens with the club designating on the course description the point value of each individual pen.

b. Sorting: At least one gate sort is required during the course regardless of division. A sort of at least 3 marked animals is required. The dog and handler will work together during the sort.

 

 

Members,
 
The following motion has been voted on this month by the ASCA Board. Results are below.
 

TR.17.01 Premium Template

Approve: Unanimous

Motion carries.

 

Motion by Wesen

I move to accept the following motion from the Tracking Committee.

 

Effective Date: Upon Board approval.

 

Motion by Maia Halvorsen

Second by Nita Gandara

I move that the attached blank sample Tracking Test premium list be used to replace the sample premium list currently included in the ASCA Tracking Regulations, June 2016, pages 55 and 56, and that it be placed in the sample section of the June 2017 version of the ASCA Tracking Rules and Regulations.

 

Rationale: The reason for this sample premium list revision and replacement is that the current sample premium list is out of date.  It omits the existence of the ASCA Tracking Dog Urban (TDU) Test, so it is not consistent with the ASCA Tracking Regulations, June, 2016, and it does not include some information that is important for would-be exhibitors.  The ASCA Tracking Committee has revised the current sample premium list to bring it up-to-date with current regulations and to make it more informative for exhibitors.  It is important that the sample premium list to be as accurate and informative as possible because host club tracking test committees usually refer to the sample as a template for their own premium lists, rather than searching through the tracking regulations to design premium lists de-novo.

 

Results of the committee vote:

Approve: Unanimous